Policies

All resources (1 - 10) of 18

An Introduction to the IPC Policies for Domiciliary Care

An introduction to the 16 Policies describing the precautions and control measures that are essential to prevent and control infection in Domiciliary Care settings. Also a Contents List of the Policies that are available. Size: 16 Policies that can be adopted, together with the...

Type: Policies

Audience: Domiciliary Care

Blood-borne viruses Policy for Domiciliary Care

Blood-borne viral infections are spread by direct contact with the blood of an infected person. The main blood-borne viruses of concern are: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), which causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus...

Type: Policies

Audience: Domiciliary Care

Clostridium difficile Policy for Domiciliary Care

Clostridium difficile affects mainly people aged over 65, although people of all ages can get it. The infection nearly always occurs in patients given antibiotics. Service users who have contracted Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection are being asked to “carry the card” to...

Type: Policies

Audience: Domiciliary Care

Decontamination, cleaning and disinfection Policy for Domiciliary Care

The environment and equipment may look clean, but micro-organisms may be present, some are harmful, some not. Removal of micro-organisms, dust and dirt is a very important part of infection prevention and control. A downloadable Community Infection Prevention and Control (IPC)...

Type: Policies

Audience: Domiciliary Care

Enteral feeding Policy for Domiciliary Care

Enteral feeding is a process where nutrition is delivered into an individual’s gastrointestinal tract via a nasogastric tube, a gastrostomy or a jejunostomy. This Policy has been produced for safe practice which will assist staff to reduce the risk of infection...

Type: Policies

Audience: Domiciliary Care

Environmental cleanliness Policy for Domiciliary Care

The cleanliness of the environment is important to support infection prevention and control, help reduce the incidence of healthcare-associated infections and ensure service user confidence. Staff play an important role in improving the quality of the environment and maintaining standards....

Type: Policies

Audience: Domiciliary Care

Hand hygiene Policy for Domiciliary Care

Handwashing is the single most important way to prevent the spread of infection. Hand decontamination has a dual role to protect both the service user and the healthcare worker from acquiring micro-organisms (germs) which may cause them harm. Hands may...

Type: Policies

Audience: Domiciliary Care

Laundry Policy for Domiciliary Care

Linen can become soiled with blood, urine, faeces or other body fluids containing micro-organisms (germs). Therefore, when handling laundry, care should be taken to reduce the risk of spreading infection. A downloadable Community Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) Policy which can...

Type: Policies

Audience: Domiciliary Care

MRGNB including ESBL and CPE Policy for Domiciliary Care

Some types of bacteria have developed resistance to many commonly used antibiotics, which can be passed on to other species of bacteria. A downloadable Community Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) Policy which can be adopted by your organisation is available below....

Type: Policies

Audience: Domiciliary Care

MRSA Policy for Domiciliary Care

MRSA stands for Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This bacterium lives harmlessly on the skin and in the nose. MRSA is resistant to some of the commonly used antibiotics, such as flucloxacillin. A downloadable Community Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) Policy which can be adopted...

Type: Policies

Audience: Domiciliary Care